Essays On A Raisin In The Sun-Dreams Deferred

A Raisin in the Sun Essay: Importance of Deferred Dreams

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Importance of Deferred Dreams in A Raisin in the Sun

A dream is a hope, a wish, and an aspiration. Young people have dreams about what they want to be when they grow up. Parents have dreams for their children's future. Not all of these dreams come true at the desired moment - these dreams are postponed or "deferred". A deferred dream is put on the "back burner of life"(Jemie 219), and it matures to its full potential, and is waiting when you are "ready to pursue it"(Jemie 219). It is assumed that the deferred event, though later than hoped for, will eventually come true.

Deferred dreams are a significant component of "A Raisin in the Sun"; the word "dream" is used a total of fourteen times throughout the play. Mama,…show more content…

Walter is furious with Mama for "butchering up his dream" (Hansberry) and when she entrusts him with the money leftover from the down payment, he is irresponsible and losses it. The white residents of Clybourne Park also attempt to defer the dream. Mr. Lindner, a representative of the residents, even offers to buy back their house for more money than they put down. Tempting, but no thanks! Her dream of home ownership seems to be dead until Mama, Ruth, Beneatha and Walter cooperate to achieve to goal. The goal even shifts slight to encompass standing up for themselves by moving into an all-white neighborhood. Even Walter does his part by refusing Mr. Lindner's offer of money.

Langston Hughes, author of the poem, Dream Deferred, made the most quoted observations on deferred dreams. Hughes was the first to ask the question: "What happens to a dream deferred"? "All African-Americans have had a dream deferred"(Wintz 179). Their dream was for the abolishment of segregation and the outlaw of discrimination. Slavery had come to an end with the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863, "but one hundred years later,...the Negro is still not free" (King). "America has defaulted on this promissory note" (King). But the African- Americans refused to accept the "bad check" (King). Martin Luther King, Jr. conveyed the "urgency" (King) of the situation that had been sizzling

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Dreams Deferred In Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin In The Sun

Lorraine Hansberry’s classic play, A Raisin in the Sun, culls its title from the infamous poem “Dream Deferred” by Langston Hughes, and both works discuss what happens to a person when their dreams -- their hopes, their aspirations, their lives -- are endlessly put on hold. For this analysis of the dreams and character of Beneatha Younger in Raisin, I would like to pull on another dreamy poem of Langston Hughes’ entitled “Dream Boogie.” Like all the characters in the play, Beneatha has dreams that are dear to her, but their deferment does not cause them to dry up, fester, rot, crust, sag, or explode. Rather, the deferment of Bennie’s dreams expresses itself in her “dream boogie”: in her sarcastic, biting wit and her life perspective that to the outside world might seem a bit naive or cutesy, in much the same way that jazz is described in “Dream Boogie”. Through Beneatha’s relationships and interactions with her mother, Walter Lee, and Asagai, we see the effects of the deferment of a dream on Bennie, and the peculiar rhythm of her boogie.

The mother-daughter relationship between Beneatha Younger and Lena Younger is one that, at first blush, appears to be the typical struggle between a defiant daughter and her older, wiser mother. However, when we look deeper, we see the deferred dreams of both women come through. One morning after breakfast, Bennie admits to her mother that “I don’t believe in God. I don’t even think about it . . . I get tired of Him getting credit for all the things the human race achieves through its own stubborn effort.” (51) This brash statement is immediately followed by some slapping action on the part of the mother, who is naturally horrified at the blasphemous things coming from her offspring’s tender lips. This scene of conflict between a parent and child also portrays the nature of each woman’s deferred dream: Lena has responded to her dream with a reinvigorated trust in God, while Bennie has chosen to reject the very notion of higher powers in favor of self-determinism. To a stranger watching, it may seem to be a relatively simple conflict; however, much like the melody of a boogie, there’s much more than meets the eye (or ear), and the reality of the situation may surprise the unprepared.

We see the literal expression of a “dream boogie” in a scene that encapsulates the brother-sister dual-dreamer relationship of Beneatha and Walter Lee. After a heavy bout of drinking, Walter comes home to find Bennie dancing away to an African beat, and he joins...

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Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun

732 words - 3 pages The above passage taken from the play A Raisin In The Sun by Lorraine Hansberry between Mama and her son Walter shows how the author can address many themes of the play in one scene or even just a few lines; She addresses such themes as dreams, prejudice, and family. Mama is the head of the household where she lives with her son Walter and wife Ruth with their son Travis along with Walter’s sister Beneatha or Bennie as some like to call her....

Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun

693 words - 3 pages A Raisin in the Sun In A Raisin in the Sun, Hansberry portrays obstacles that the Younger family and other African Americans had to face and over come during the post World War 2 era. Obstacles that had to be over come by the Youngers were economical, moral, social, and racist obstacles. Lorraine Hansberry, the author of the play had to face one of these as well growing up. Born in Chicago on the...

Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun

817 words - 3 pages Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun In the play, A Raisin in the Sun, by Lorraine Hansberry, one of the most important themes is the American Dream. Many of the characters in this play have hopes and aspirations; they all strive towards their goals throughout the play. However, many of the characters in the play have different dreams that clash with each other. Problems seem to arise when different people’s dreams conflict with one...

Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun - 971 words

971 words - 4 pages A Raisin in the Sun A Raisin in the Sun, by Lorraine Hansberry, illustrates the timeless struggle for the furtherance of family values and morals with extreme clarity. The play follows the life of a small black family’s struggle to keep their dreams from tenants to owners alive. These dreams, and the struggles necessary to reach them, as well as coming to terms with the dreams that are out of reach, are the focus and driving force behind...

Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun - 3913 words

3913 words - 16 pages Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun A dream deferred is a dream put off to another time, much like this essay. But unlike dreams sometimes, this essay will get fulfilled and done with. Each character from A Raisin in the Sun had a deferred dream, even little Travis although his dream was not directly stated.      Their dreams become dried up like a raisin in the sun. Not just dreams are dried up though; Walter Lee and Ruth’s...

Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun - 1183 words

1183 words - 5 pages Lorraine Hansberry’s novel, A Raisin in the Sun, revolves around a middle-class African-American family, struggling during World War II. By reading about the Younger’s true to life experiences, one learns many important life lessons. One of the aforementioned would be that a person should always put family’s needs before their own. There are many examples of this throughout the novel. Just a few of these would be the example of Ruth and her...

Lorraine Hansberry's A Raisin In The Sun - 920 words

920 words - 4 pages A Raisin in the Sun Throughout the play, A Raisin in the Sun, the character Beneatha talks about finding her identity. The concept of assimilation becomes very important to the Younger family. Neither of the members of the Younger family wanted to assimilate into mainstream America, they just want to live comfortably. The Youngers are an African American family living on the south side of Chicago in the 1950s. They were living during an era...

Dream Deferred in A Raisin in the Sun

1052 words - 4 pages "What Happens to a Dream Deferred?" Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? Or fester like a sore– And then run?" (Langston Hughes). It is important to never lose sight of one’s dream. Dreams are what keep people moving in life, but if they are ignored, they may morph and lose their prevailing form. This is evident in Lorraine Hansberry’s "A Raisin in the Sun", as Walter’s, Beneatha’s, and Mama’s dreams become delayed, distorted, and blurred....

Dreams in A Raisin in the Sun

994 words - 4 pages Demi Munnik48898821Assignment 2 - Eng 2603Dreams in A Raisin in the Sun "What happens to a dream deferred?"...

Dreams in A Raisin in the Sun

994 words - 4 pages Demi Munnik48898821Assignment 2 - Eng 2603Dreams in A Raisin in the Sun "What happens to a dream deferred?"...

Dreams in A Raisin in the Sun

705 words - 3 pages Dreams in A Raisin in the Sun          Lena, Walter, Ruth, and Beneatha Younger all lived under the same roof, but their dreams were all different. Being the head of the household, Lena dreamed the dreams of her children and would do whatever it took to make those dreams come true. Walter, Lena's oldest son, set his dream on the liquor store that he planned to invest with the money of his mother....

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