Short Story Accident Essays On Love

  • Greensleeves Hubs 6 days agofrom Essex, UK

    Billie Raucci and Anil.K.R; thank you both very much for you comments. Cheers, Alun

  • Anil.K.R 6 days ago

    Love your stories

  • Billie Raucci 6 weeks agofrom Illinois

    Love your stories and ideas!

  • Greensleeves Hubs 7 weeks agofrom Essex, UK

    Finn Liam Cooper; It's so nice to see your work in print isn't it! :) It is an exercise which I like because it teaches discipline and the value of brevity and conciseness in writing and yet grants immediate reward - it doesn't take months or years to complete and publish your story as it does when writing a book!

    Thanks also to Chloe and Teena for your comments.

  • Finn Liam Cooper 8 weeks agofrom Los Angeles

    Nice concept. In Tucson there was a paper called The Tucson Weekly and they had a section called Dust Devils. You were to create a narrative in 75 words or less. I submitted several pieces and had two published back in the 1990s.

  • teena 3 months ago

    Thanks you very much

  • Chloe 5 months ago

    I love yours examples they give me an idea

  • Greensleeves Hubs 11 months agofrom Essex, UK

    John Gentile; Thanks very much John. It was fun composing them :) Alun

  • John Gentile 11 months agofrom Connecticut

    I like your 50 word mini stories. Some of them were very funny. Thanks for sharing.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 15 months agofrom Essex, UK

    Felipe; Thanks Felipe - It's always nice to see other peoples' contributions, and it's interesting to read about the challenge you set for your students. I should explain that this is not my site. I write on it but I do not own it.

    This collection of mini-stories is currently on 'Letterpile'. But Letterpile is just a creative writing subdivision of 'HubPages' - a content site where anyone who wishes to write, can contribute articles (in English) on any subject they like. It is a community of writers. I for example contribute articles on travel, astronomy, politics and many other subjects besides these short stories. HubPages provides templates or 'capsules' for text, or for photos, graphs, videos etc, and the writer can then use these as he/she wishes to create an article. It's an easy way of writing a web page without having to create a website of your own.

    So whilst there unfortunately isn't a facility to post stories on this page of mine, you could easily write a page all of your own on HubPages, and post all your students' stories there. The link below will take you to a page where HubPages is explained, and there is an opportunity to sign up. It's absolutely free, and very easy to use, and you can create just one page or as many pages as you want. There's no obligations.

    https://hubpages.com/about/us

    I hope that helps, and if you decide to join, I look forward to welcoming you as a fellow member to HubPages, and I'll give you any support I can! Alun

  • Felipe 15 months ago

    Hi Alun,

    Thanks for your reply and sorry for the unusual writing about writing the other day. It was a fun exercise. I am a teacher of English in Peru, and in one of the lessons we were dealing with short stories and the challenge for the students in class was to come up with a fifty-word story. They have come up with their stories and we were wondering if we could post the stories on this page. If you give us the green light, we would appreciate it.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 15 months agofrom Essex, UK

    Felipe; Thanks! Your comment seemed a trifle unusual, so I decided to add up the words and, yes, there are of course fifty. So well done for posting both a comment on creative writing, and an additional contribution to the fifty word short story idea. So incidentally, is this reply!

  • Felipe 15 months ago

    Writing, typing, pushing keys with intensity, things you do when you need to release your repressed emotions and thoughts. Is there anything you won't confess? Maybe there is. Writing can be the medium. Once you've started, you will see how relieved you are and how much you have to confess.

  • Raeee 2 years ago

    Aliens does not have to be ugly...

    Humans = racism

  • Greensleeves Hubs 2 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Jodah; Thanks John. This was one of my very first hubs 4 years ago, and it's really nice to know that people are still finding it and reading it. It was one that I particularly enjoyed writing. Much appreciated. :) Alun

  • John Hansen 2 years agofrom Queensland Australia

    Hi Alun, I love these 50 word stories. Not an easy thing to do and make them interesting. You did it though..well done. I enjoyed them all particularly "Strangers Home and Abroad". Voted up.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 2 years agofrom Essex, UK

    EsJam; Appreciated, Alun

    ra; thanks for your opinion. Always nice to hear which stories are peoples' favourites. Alun

  • Essie 2 years agofrom Southern California

    This will be useful! Glad I found your profile...enjoying your work!

  • ra 3 years ago

    I loved the 50 word and the beatles mania one

    thnx

  • Greensleeves Hubs 4 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thank you slowpokevoyager. I'm not keen on Michael Jackson, but like some of Elvis's work, and love the Beatles - hence the decision to write them into a 50 word essay! Cheers, Alun

  • Roger Decker 4 years agofrom Braggs, Oklahoma

    Loved most of them, but I particularly enjoyed the Beatles mania one. I guess I'm old. I also still love Elvis and Michael Jackson.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 4 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Vellur; Thank you very much for your visit and for those votes and accolades. Glad you like the page, Nithya, and 'Love'. Alun.

  • Nithya Venkat 4 years agofrom Dubai

    Enjoyed reading your hub, all are great stories but I like the one called Love. Great hub, voted up awesome, interesting and useful.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 4 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thanks John; cheers for visiting and for commenting. Much appreciated.

  • John MacNab 4 years agofrom the banks of the St. Lawrence

    Excellent work Greensleeves. I liked the '50 word 'short story as well as the ' alien' one.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 4 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thank you very much Angelina for your visit. Glad you liked it :-)

  • Angelina 4 years ago

    Thank you for the great content!

  • Greensleeves Hubs 5 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thank you very much chef-de-jour for your visit and comments. It was enjoyable to write these. Some, I remember came very easily, while others took an age fine-tuning, and just weeding out the last few surplus words to make the total exactly 50.

    But it's an interesting exercise to try, and I guess to follow up on your point, these stories are a way in which anyone can be creative, without having to devote their lives to writing a full blown book or a play. Alun.

  • Andrew Spacey 5 years agofrom Near Huddersfield, West Yorkshire,UK

    There's something of the fable in these half century stories and some are just fun compilations with a punchline! Short shorts are quite the literary thing at present - is it flash fiction? - bursts of prose in concentrated form. Fascinating.

    Thanks for the hub, I vote it up.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 5 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thanks starstream for that, and apologies for not responding much sooner. I agree very much that word exercises like this do make for good literary competitions

  • Dreamer at heart 5 years agofrom Northern California

    This is a good idea for a hub pages contest. I think it would be a helpful exercise for all of us too.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 6 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Many thanks TeddyAldo for that really nice comment.

    I see you've only just joined HubPages. My best wishes and hopes that you enjoy writing on the site.

  • TeddyAldo 6 years agofrom Massachusetts

    I really enjoyed Love. Great original work. Really moved me.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 6 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thank you very much sofs for visiting and for giving a really nice comment like that. Cheers.

  • sofs 6 years ago

    Great Hub..glad I found it on the featured hubs... I love your stories and voted on them.. Have a great day ..God Bless:)

  • Greensleeves Hubs 6 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Millionaire Tips. Thank you so much for including a link and plaudits to this page, in your hub. I am grateful.

  • Shasta Matova 6 years agofrom USA

    I wanted to let you know that I really liked this hub, and am including it in my hub which lists my favorite hubs I've read this week.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 6 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thank you Millionaire Tips!Your visit and comments are appreciated!

  • Shasta Matova 6 years agofrom USA

    These are all great! As you can tell by the poll, they are equally popular.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 6 years agofrom Essex, UK

    I LIKE IT DERDRIU!

    A much happier, more satisfactory ending to their overseas vacation! It made me laugh.

    And to be able to have written such a good revised sequel in what must have been less than an hour, suggests maybe you should try your hand at more of these 50 word stories.

    :-)

  • Derdriu 6 years ago

    Alun: I feel shame-faced for giving Charlie and Marge such a dark ending. I fear that I am influenced by having watched a series of old Alfred Hitchcock films, such as "Vertigo" and "Strangers on a Train" (the original with Robert Walker Sr. and Farley Granger). So long live revisionism:

    As their house came into view Charlie and Marge gasped.

    Their garden, no longer a blight, was blooming with flowers and vegetables.

    Opening the front door, they were greeted with delicious aromas from the kitchen.

    A hearty fire crackled in the fireplace.

    A note from their housesitter said, “Welcome home.”

    Respectfully,

    Derdriu

  • Greensleeves Hubs 6 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Yes Derdriu - very very good! :-)

    I did count the words in your sequel to my story because I had an idea of what you might be doing and yes, there are 50 words, so I have to say very good and funny. I like it! Not sure I would wish such an ending for Charlie and Marge's holidday though - I prefer happy endings to holidays!

    Many thanks. Alun.

  • Derdriu 6 years ago

    Alun: Here is what may have happened next in "Strangers Home and Abroad": Charlie and Marge returned from holiday. They found the basement of their house flooded to the top of the stairs. All the toilets were overflowing. Their big-screen TVs were missing. There had been a fire in the study. The pantry was bare. Their long-gone neighbor's note read, "Always check references."

    Thank you for sharing your unique mini-storytelling skills, voted up, etc.,

    Derdriu

  • Greensleeves Hubs 6 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thanks for visiting 2uesday, and for voting in the poll. Some of the stories were easier than others to write; the biggest problem of course, is when you write something you're really proud of - and then you find it's about ten words too long! There were two or three stories I wrote which never got published because it simply proved too difficult to cut any more words out, without the whole piece losing its meaning or its impact.

  • 2uesday 6 years ago

    Nice idea for a HubPage, I have written fifty word stories in the past and it is not as easy as it looks. Going to look at them again before I vote.

  • sharon 6 years ago

    sorry that there was option to click for only one favourite I did like the gambler's sin,true intelligence and the faithful companion.Well written It must be hard to get all your thoughts in 50 words.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 7 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thanks for your nice comments Marie; very sweet!

  • Marie Landry 7 years agofrom Ontario, Canada

    This is great! I've never tried this, but I imagine it's pretty difficult - I tend to be kind of wordy! I'm going to give it a go though. I voted in the poll for True Intelligence? but also really enjoyed The Gambler's Sin, Fun With the Beatles and An Old Fashioned Long Distance Relationship.

  • Greensleeves Hubs 7 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thanks avid gardener for your comments; it was nice to read them.

  • avid gardener 7 years agofrom Florida

    I actually had a few favorites but you can only vote for one. I like the alien,true intelligence, and computer dating. I thought they were all quite good actually. It doesn't take long to get to the point!

  • Greensleeves Hubs 7 years agofrom Essex, UK

    Thanks to both Pandoras Box and ahorseback for your kind comments. It's really nice to read them. Thanks.

  • ahorseback 7 years ago

    Greensleeves , love the hub , I like the way you write !

  • Pandoras Box 7 years agofrom A Seemingly Chaotic World

    My fave is Strangers Home and Abroad, but the Deadly Encounter was a very close second. What a great writing exercise. You came up with some insightful mini-stories.

  • Share your story here for possible inclusion in Reader’s Digest »

    Kagan McLeod for Reader's DigestA SOLDIER’S SUPRISE

    by Gail Litrenti-Benedetto, Park Ridge, Illinois

    It is spring of 1943 during World War II. Standing among hundreds of new soldiers at Camp Grant, in Illinois, my father, Sam, just 18 years old, waits as a truck slowly drives by. A full field pack is randomly tossed to each soldier. “How strange,” my father thinks, as he sees his last name, Litrenti, marked on each item in his pack. “How did they know it was me when they tossed the pack?” He was impressed! Beating all odds, my father was tossed a field pack from World War I—his own father’s.

     

    SMOKE SIGNALS

    by Dan Rolince, Golden, Colorado

    On a cool night lit only by the orange glow of fire, we rushed to my grandfather’s home as his decades-old barn burned to the ground. The firemen let us stand nearby as they pumped water from the creek a quarter mile away. We watched the barn go up in flames, which stirred memories of jumping off foot-wide wooden beams into the hay below. The real sadness came as my elderly grandfather, who did not get out of bed, quietly asked if his cows were safe. He hadn’t had dairy cows in a dozen years.


     

    A MOTHER’S WISDOM

    by Lori Armstrong, Kelseyville, California

    I have always worn my children’s birthstones around my neck. One morning, when I was late for work, my infant son Larry’s topaz birthstone fell from my gold chain. I frantically searched for it, whispering to myself, “I lost my Larry, but I will get him back.”

    That day, Larry’s cardiologist called with test results from one of his first checkups. He would need emergency heart surgery. Happily, the operation was a success, and I whispered in Larry’s ear, “I thought I lost you, but I knew I’d get you back.”

    Kagan McLeod for Reader's Digest

    THE GOOD DOCTOR 

    by Danica Helfin, Tifton, Georgia

    Toto was a white dog with a small red tongue, and his stuffing was red as well. When his seams began to come apart beneath his knitted collar, it looked to my six-year-old eyes as though he were bleeding. That night, my father left for his shift in the emergency room with Toto wrapped in a blanket. The next day, Dad showed me the X-rays and Polaroid photographs of the
    surgery. Beneath the bandage on Toto’s neck was a clean row of stitches. I still have the injury report! I love you, Dad.

    A SMALL FORTUNE
    by Ron Fleming, Fort Drum, New York

    While walking across an open, grassy field, I became excited as my hand swooped toward the ground like an eagle attacking its prey. I picked up half of a $5 bill. I continued to walk around looking for the other half but thought to myself it would be impossible to find it on such a windy day. As I lifted my head, I spotted the other half of the bill tangled in crabgrass. Somehow, finding two halves of a ripped $5 bill felt better than working for a twenty.

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    SWEET SLEEP
    by Suzanne Cifarelli, Albany, New York

    Don’t let her sleep in your bed.” That’s what I heard over and over after my daughter was born.
    So I didn’t, unless she was sick. Now my baby is almost six, and every night, after we read and sing songs and turn off the light, I lie down with her before she falls asleep. We whisper to each other, and I watch her eyelids start to flutter. I smell her hair and kiss her forehead. And I wish I had done this every night.

    MY MASTERPIECE
    by Angela Bradley-Autrey, Deer Park, Washington

    I was four, playing outside in the humid Kentucky air. I saw my grandfather’s truck and thought, Granddad shouldn’t have to drive such an ugly truck. Then I spied a gallon of paint. Idea! I got a brush and painted white polka dots all over the truck. I was on the roof finishing the job when he walked up, looking as if he were in a trance.
    “Angela, that’s the prettiest truck I’ve ever seen!” Sometimes I think adults don’t stop to see things through a child’s eyes. He could have crushed me. Instead, he lifted my little soul.

    THE LONG LIFE OF ROOM 1108
    by Laurie Olson, Dayton, Nevada

    A long flight of weathered steps led to a hollow wooden door with rusty numbers beckoning us into room 1108. Inside, we barely noticed the lumpy bed, faded wood paneling, and thin, tacky carpet.
    We could see the seashore from our perch and easily wander down to feel the sand between our toes. We returned again and again until the burgeoning resort tore down our orange-shingled eyesore. Forty years later, my husband periodically sends me short e-mails that declare the time: 11:08. “I love you, too,” I write back.

    A Date With Fate 
    by Emily Page Hatch, Wilmington, North Carolina

    In a kitschy bar in Cambridge, he asked to sit at my table, though later he would insist that I made the first move. I was intrigued by his tattoos. He thought I went to Harvard. All we had in common was that we’d both almost stayed home. Friends had dragged us out on a frigid February evening. We still never agree on anything, except that it’s a darn good thing we sucked it up that snowy night. Our wild blue-eyed son always stops us in our tracks, reminding us that fate is just as fragile as our memory.

     

    Kagan McLeod for Reader's DigestPERFECT DAY
    by Marybob Straub, Smyrna, Georgia

    We went looking for a wedding dress on Sunday. Laughing, we made for the door of a bridal shop. This would surely be the first of many stores before we found the perfect gown. Having witnessed other brides and their mothers, we vowed to be happy in these moments. Unexpectedly, my mind went back to the day we brought her home some 27 years ago. I said a silent thank-you to the young mother who, by letting her go, allowed her to be mine at this precious time. Two hours later, there she stood, in the dress of her dreams. My beautiful girl.

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    SHATTERED
    by Pat Guthrie, Pulaski, Virginia

    My elderly sister decided for the first time to stay up until midnight on New Year’s Eve in New York City to watch the ball drop. The next morning, she reported that she was disappointed. When I asked her why, she said that on the news the day before, the reporters had talked about the crystals inside the ball and what a piece would be worth if someone got ahold of one. But then the ball descended very slowly. She’d expected it to crash and that people would scramble for the pieces. She’d wanted to see that!

    ALWAYS GROWING
    by Julie Liska, Seward, Nebraksa

    Dad auctioned off his faithful red tractor, rented out the land, and retired from farming in 1982. He and Mom moved to town. But they reserved a small plot of land for a garden and returned each week of summer to tend it. Winter brought new challenges. Dad had his hips replaced, bypass and cataract surgeries, and a stroke. Yet each spring the garden was planted, watered, lovingly tended—the bounty shared with all. Now Dad is 93; his pale blue eyes dodge the sun as he gingerly plucks red tomatoes from the vine. “What will you remember about me?”

    Kagan McLeod for Reader's DigestDARK WATERS
    by Daryl Eigen, Portland, Oregon
    Night wreck diving in Micronesia is scary. One hundred feet down, the water is the blackest. Two of us dived toward a sunken ship that soon loomed large in the dark water. We felt the ghosts of the Japanese sailors who had died with this WWII freighter. Swimming deeper into the ship’s bowels, my buddy suddenly hit a layer of reflective silt, blinding us. Together we groped through the ship, breaking through the uninterrupted, silent blackness of the sea. Watching our bubbles, we rose to the surface, where I ripped off my mask to breathe the tropical air.

    BLACK CAT
    Kelly Hennigan, 
Lacona, New York
    A wee bit of a kitten, she meowed louder than a freight train from behind the shelter’s cage. “Can we get this one?” asked Katie, age seven. “I don’t know,” I said. “A black cat may not be good luck.” To her, I was the young live‑in girlfriend and sometimes the one claiming her dad’s attention. A week later, we picked up our loud but little black kitten and named her Jasmine. Twenty years later, Jasmine’s old and loved, and when Katie comes home to visit, she greets me 
with a hug. We both agree: Black cats aren’t bad luck!

    MONSTER PATROL
    Aaron Hampton, Seattle, Washington
    As a child, I had awful night terrors—at one point, I stopped sleeping. Then my dad’s younger brother lost his job and had to move in with us. Uncle Dave slept in the room next to mine. From then on, he was there to comfort me, sometimes even sleeping on the floor beside my bed “to keep the monsters away.” 
After he landed a job, he could have moved into a nice apartment, but I begged him not to go. When my parents asked why he was staying, he smiled and replied, “Monsters.”

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    EXCESS BAGGAGE
    by Eileen Dougharty, Chicago, Illinois

    “Ticket is $287. But all of that is a problem.” She’s referring to my luggage cart, stacked with suitcases, boxes, and a bag full of shoes. “One bag is free. Everything else is $100 each.” I tell her I packed my Volkswagen after discovering my boyfriend was cheating. Fried the engine. Hitchhiked to the airport in flip‑flops. She left her cheating husband recently, hardest decision she ever made. She checks it all, charges me nothing. As I leave, I don’t feel the crush of having no plan, only the weightlessness of being free.

    PRAYER QUILT
    Jennifer Thornburg, San Tan Valley, Arizona

    I started quilting so I could spend time with my aunt. I didn’t accomplish much until my little sister was put into the hospital. She lived 13 hours away, which meant I couldn’t be at her side, but I could pray, and I could make her a blanket. Every stitch was sewn with prayer and tears, memories woven in between layers of cotton and polyester. Doctors said she was going to die at least three times. I sewed faster. By God’s good grace, I delivered that blanket two years ago, and my sister still sleeps under it today.

    BACKUP BAND-AID
    Babette Lazarus, New York, New York

    I was riding the subway and happened to be seated between two young guys. The one on the right eyed the slightly grungy Band‑Aid on my thumb and said, “You should really change that, you know. You have to keep it clean.” Then the one on my left said, “Here, I have one,” and pulled a fresh Band‑Aid out of his knapsack. “I keep them on me because I’m always hurting myself.” Incredulous, I thanked him, changed my bandage, and got off at my stop feeling pretty good about people, life, and New York City.

     

    Kagan McLeod for Reader's DIgestLOVE, EDITED
    by Mahjabeen Daya, Brampton, Ontario

    When I was raising my 14-year-old son as a single mother in Toronto, he helped me publish a magazine. One day, an incredibly handsome, soft-spoken, well-mannered visitor from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, visited my office. We shared our experiences as volunteer editors. When he left, my son whispered, “Mom! Now, that’s the kind of man you should marry!” I blushed and laughed it off and didn’t think about it again. Eight years later, I met the same man again. He was now a widower. We married and are still together nine years later, coediting an international magazine.

    THE YELLOW HOUSE
    by Rose McMills, Woodridge, Illinois

    I’ve lived in my condo 15 years now—long enough that I don’t even see it anymore. I started dreaming about moving into a house, where I was bound to be happier. I fixated on little yellow houses somewhere in the suburbs of Chicago and watched for them from the train on my commute. “Oh, look—there’s one!” I’d say as it slid by. Then one day, sitting in the sun on my patio, I looked up and realized the outside of my condo was done in yellow siding. I already had a yellow house. And I was home!

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    EMERGENCY CONTACT
    by James Gates, Watertown, South Dakota

    We’d divorced three years earlier and hadn’t seen each other since, but for whatever reason, I never took her off my emergency contact list at the nearest hospital. After my accident, I was put in a medically induced coma, and when I woke, she was the only person in the room. She sat in a hospital recliner, watching The View, looking unshowered. She turned her head casually as I slowly came to. “It’s just like you to have something like this happen,” she said. “I’m here, so I figure I’ll get us something to eat. What do you want?”

    Kagan McLeod for Reader's DigestSS SERENDIPITY
    by Vernon Magnesen, Elmhurst, Illinois

    In July 1915, Henry and his eight-year-old daughter, Pearl, were excited for the company outing the next day. That evening, Henry had a violent argument with his landlord, ending with the landlord spitting on a painting of the Virgin Mary. Henry was so upset, he fell ill and canceled their trip. He and Pearl missed the cruise on the SS Eastland, which sank with over 800 people on board—but not my future grandfather and mother. Thanks to that miracle argument 100 years ago, 22 descendants are alive today.

    CLEAR EYES, FULL HEARTS
    by Stephanie Adair, Metairie, Louisiana

    Every day, upon picking up my 11-year-old son from school, I would ask, “How was your day?” For years, I got the same response—“Fine, fine”—with no eye contact. His autism, it seemed, was going to deprive me of the normal chitchat parents unconsciously relish. One early spring afternoon, I asked the question, expecting the same answer. “How was your day?” My son replied, “Good, good.” Then he looked at me and said, “How was your day, Mom?” With tears streaming down my face, I said, “It’s really good—the best day ever.”

    TINY TREE
    Monte Unger, Colorado Springs, Colorado

    A neighborhood kid with branches and leaves sticking out of his pockets and a headband came into our front yard. He looked like a little soldier in camouflage. “I’m acting like a tree so butterflies will come,” he said. As he waited on the grass, I brought out a huge blue preserved butterfly I’d purchased in Malaysia and hid it behind my back. I walked over, kneeled, pulled out the butterfly, and said, “A butterfly has come to see you.” He gasped, and his eyes widened. His wishes won’t always come true, but one did that day.

    Kagan McLeod for Reader's DigestWHO GOES THERE?
    by Nettie Gornick, Butler, Pennsylvania

    In 1943, I was 19 years old and worked at a barbecue located about a mile from my home. It was a beautiful, warm June night, so I decided to walk home from work rather than take a bus. As I walked up the back porch steps, I heard a male voice: “Kiss me, or I’ll scream.” After my initial shock, I turned around to see a young soldier in an Army uniform. I kissed him softly on the cheek. He smiled. “Thank you,” he said, and walked off into the night.

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    BIG SHOES TO FILL
    by Theresa Arnold, Tioga, Texas

    I cleaned out Dad’s closet yesterday. There were two things I couldn’t box up: his work shirts and his two pairs of Red Wing boots. He couldn’t remember birthdays or anniversaries, but he remembered the date on which he’d bought his first pair. I
    remember it too—April 16, the day after Tax Day. What does a child do with her dad’s favorite boots? I think I will make a planter out of them or use them to store something valuable. You can’t throw away a man’s favorite boots. You’ve got to keep them and pass them down.

    A GUIDING HAND
    by Grace Napier, Greeley, Colorado

    En route to work, I turned right to leave my yard when a firm hand restrained my right shoulder, shoving me left. No one else was present. I followed a longer route to a traffic light intersection on Lincoln Highway, where traffic was not moving, and headed for my work site. At the end of the workday, I returned home and learned of the accident that morning only minutes after 8:00, when two vehicles crashed, pinning the crossing guard between them and killing him. I would have been in that accident. My guardian angel had preserved my life!

    Do you have a story in you? Share it here for possible inclusion in Reader’s Digest »

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